Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Patent ductus arteriosus



Patent ductus arteriosus

Patent ductus arteriosus

The PDA refers to a congenital heart disorder that occurs when after birth, the neonate’s ductus arteriosus refuses to close. In most cases, there are no signs or early symptoms; however, during the first year, symptoms such as increased breathing rates and low weight gain can be experienced. This may be aggravated with age and if nothing is done to correct the anomaly; it can lead to congestive heart failure. As such, the ductus arteriosus refers to a normal fetal blood vessel that shuts down immediately after birth. On the other hand, the patent ductus arteriosus or PDA remains open after birth resulting to irregularity in blood transmission between two vital arteries to the heart –the pulmonary and the aorta.

People with persistent respiratory problems like hypoxia and who have a higher premature children occurrence are highly susceptible to PDA. In cases of hypoxic babies, very little oxygen finds its way to the lungs to enable the production of sufficient bradykinin levels and subsequent DA closure. In essence, children who are born prematurely face a higher risk of being hypoxic and develop PDA due to their badly developed lungs and heart. In a situation where the patent ductus arteriosus does not work as it should, allowing the flow of portions of blood containing oxygen from the left heart back to the lungs, it causes the neonate to run out of breath.

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