Sunday, March 3, 2013

Management of Meningitis

Management of Meningitis

Management of Meningitis
The management in meningitis resembles that of the management of other infections. If the causative agent is likely to be a bacteria, antibiotics are readily introduced to the patient even before the result of the lumbar puncture this is to decrease any instances of worsening the disease before the results was read.  Drugs that are commonly used are Cefotaxime, Ceftriaxone or  Cloramphenicol, in some instances one of which is combined with another strong drug such as vancomycin or ampicillin. Some practitioners also add steroids as adjuvant treatment due to the relevant decrease of hearing loss in patients on the antibiotic adjunct with steroids, to include that better prognosis is also observed.
 
In cases of viral meninges meningitis, the manage is mostly consisted of supportive therapy.  This means that there is no particular drug that is given to the patient, the management is mainly consist of increasing fluid intake, bedrest and pain relievers.
Lastly, fungal meningitis, it is treated by intravenous amphoteracin B with or without oral flucytosine or fluconazole. Also amphotheracin can be administered intrathecal, injecting it to the spinal cord. This is done in combination with the intravenous administration when the patient does not respond to the IV administrations. Oral fluconazole is used as suppressive therapy when the CSF analysis becomes has a negative result of the organism for it is better tolerated by patients and less toxic than amphoteracin.
The patient should be carefully turned when positioning and be given with a healthy nutritious diet during the course of treatment. The dura mater contains spaces called dural venous sinuses which collect blood from the small veins of the brain. The arachnoid’s crucial function is the production of cerebrospinal fluid, it also has unique finger-like projections that absorb CSF thus preventing too much CSF accumulation. The last most inner layer, the pia mater, tightly bounds the surface of the brain and the spinal cord. 

No comments:

Post a Comment